Corpse Pose (Savasana)

The final pose of any yoga class is one of deep restoration: Corpse Pose, also sometimes called Final Relaxation Pose. Its Sanskrit name, “Savasana” (shah-VAHS-uh-nuh), comes from two words. The first is “Sava” (meaning “corpse”), and the second is “asana” (meaning “pose”). Savasana implies a depth of release that goes beyond simple relaxation. This resting pose takes your yoga practice to a place where you can completely let go.

It looks like the easiest pose in the whole yoga practice, but when doing its one the hardest pose. But the benefits of  Savasana are more than any other asana (posture). That’s why it is recommended that you should do savasana after every 30 minutes of yoga practice, if not, than once after finishing the yoga class or practice.

At the end of every yoga class, you know those few minutes when you’re asked to lie down straight, with your legs placed apart and arms by your side. It is a moment when you oscillate between relaxation and blissful sleep by performing an ancient yoga asana known as Shavasana or Savasana (pronounced as Shuh-vaas-ana) that takes its name from two Sanskrit words ‘shava‘ which means cobra and ‘asana‘ which means post.

Benefits Of Shavasana

Savasana relaxes the central nervous system, giving the cells of the body an opportunity to really permeate the fresh oxygenated blood, easing all the muscles and giving them the best treat after its hard work during playtime. Allowing your body to fully immerse in this pose will signal a sense of gratitude for being on the edge, and staying strong through those tough poses. Corpse pose also calms the brain which alleviates headaches, fatigue, stress and mild depression.

 

How To Do Corpse Pose (Savasana)

Set yourself up for success. Stretch out on your mat and be sure you’re completely comfortable. Use bolsters, pillows, blankets, and cover your eyes with an eye pillow or towel. The more comfortable you are, the more you can relax.

Take one final cleansing breath. Your teacher will likely prompt you to take one audible exhale, signaling to your body to release into the pose.

Scan for tension. Mentally run through all the parts of your body and try to make them heavier. Be on the lookout for tension hiding in the jaw, temples, shoulders, and hips

Set an intention.Before you come out of Savasana, take a mental snapshot of how you feel on every level. Ask yourself what you’d like to take with you from your practice, and what you might like to leave behind

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *