STANDING SPINAL TWIST YOGA POSE (KATICHAKRASANA)

The word Katichakrasana comes from the Sanskrit words ‘Kati’ which means waist, ‘Chakra’ which means wheel or circular rotation and ‘Asana’ which means pose. It is also one of the basic yoga asanas that can be easily performed by a beginner. The only thing that is needed is to have a balance of the feet.
Uttanasana is a widely practiced classic standing forward-bend pose that works every part of your body, but particularly your spine. It also wakes up the hamstrings and soothes the mind. Practitioners say this pose rejuvenates the nervous system, eases depression and boosts blood circulation. No wonder it’s so popular!
The standing spinal twist is good exercise for toning legs and arms, increasing flexibility and releasing upper body tension.

How to do standing spinal twist yoga pose

The easy and simple steps to perform Katichakrasana are being described below:

  • Stand straight with one foot comfortably apart.
  • Both the arms should be out-stretched in front of the chest while palms are facing to each other. It should be ensured that distance between the arms remain constant.
  • With exhale, swing the arms to the right side as far as possible by making waist rotation. Maintain the pose as long as you can. With inhale, bring your arms before the chest.
  • The same thing may be followed while bending your arms towards the left side.
  • Perform it 5 to 10 times or up to two minutes.

 Variations

Harder: If you are breathing with ease in the twist, it is fine to move on. You can spread your arms wide apart like wings. Roll open your shoulders.
Easier: To make this pose slightly less strenuous, try performing it in a ‘bound’ position. Bring your top arm behind your back and your bottom arm beneath the thigh of your front leg. Clasp your hands together and hold.

 Benefits of the Standing Spinal Twist (Katichakrasana)

  • Good for relieving constipation
  • Strengthens and improves the flexibility of the spine and waist
  • Good for arm and leg muscles
  • Opens up the neck and shoulders and strengthens the abdominal muscles and lower back
  • Beneficial for those with sedentary or deskbound jobs

 

Corpse Pose (Savasana)

The final pose of any yoga class is one of deep restoration: Corpse Pose, also sometimes called Final Relaxation Pose. Its Sanskrit name, “Savasana” (shah-VAHS-uh-nuh), comes from two words. The first is “Sava” (meaning “corpse”), and the second is “asana” (meaning “pose”). Savasana implies a depth of release that goes beyond simple relaxation. This resting pose takes your yoga practice to a place where you can completely let go.

It looks like the easiest pose in the whole yoga practice, but when doing its one the hardest pose. But the benefits of  Savasana are more than any other asana (posture). That’s why it is recommended that you should do savasana after every 30 minutes of yoga practice, if not, than once after finishing the yoga class or practice.

At the end of every yoga class, you know those few minutes when you’re asked to lie down straight, with your legs placed apart and arms by your side. It is a moment when you oscillate between relaxation and blissful sleep by performing an ancient yoga asana known as Shavasana or Savasana (pronounced as Shuh-vaas-ana) that takes its name from two Sanskrit words ‘shava‘ which means cobra and ‘asana‘ which means post.

Benefits Of Shavasana

Savasana relaxes the central nervous system, giving the cells of the body an opportunity to really permeate the fresh oxygenated blood, easing all the muscles and giving them the best treat after its hard work during playtime. Allowing your body to fully immerse in this pose will signal a sense of gratitude for being on the edge, and staying strong through those tough poses. Corpse pose also calms the brain which alleviates headaches, fatigue, stress and mild depression.

 

How To Do Corpse Pose (Savasana)

Set yourself up for success. Stretch out on your mat and be sure you’re completely comfortable. Use bolsters, pillows, blankets, and cover your eyes with an eye pillow or towel. The more comfortable you are, the more you can relax.

Take one final cleansing breath. Your teacher will likely prompt you to take one audible exhale, signaling to your body to release into the pose.

Scan for tension. Mentally run through all the parts of your body and try to make them heavier. Be on the lookout for tension hiding in the jaw, temples, shoulders, and hips

Set an intention.Before you come out of Savasana, take a mental snapshot of how you feel on every level. Ask yourself what you’d like to take with you from your practice, and what you might like to leave behind

Urdhva Mukha Svanasana(Upward-Facing Dog Pose )

Upward-Facing Dog Pose — Urdhva Mukha Svanasana (OORD-vuh MOO-kuh shvan-AHS-uh-nuh) — is a back-bending yoga posture that lengthens and strengthens the spine, torso, and arms. Its name comes from four Sanskrit words:

  • “Urdhva” — meaning “upward”
  • “Mukha” — meaning “face”
  • “Svana” — meaning “dog”
  • “Asana” — meaning “pose”

Like most yoga poses, Urdhva Mukha Svanasana must be performed at least 3-5 hours after a meal and it is preferable that your stomach and bowels should be empty at this time. Even though Urdhva Mukha Svanasana is an easy yoga pose, you can perform a few preparatory asanas as this will prepare you both physically and mentally to perform this pose. You can learn a few Urdhva Mukha Svanasana prep poses such as Bhujangasana (Cobra pose), Setu Bandhasana (Bridge pose), and Sarvangasana (Shoulderstand pose) before you learn how to do Upward Facing Dog Pose pose

Beginner’s Tips

Let go of that silly, silly belief that you need to lift your chin. Let that be the icing on the cake. Think this pose more of a chest opener than backbend. Drawing the nose into the face helps to lengthen the neck and melt the shoulders away from the ears, creating more space to open up.

Oh, and BREATHE! Otherwise, you will die…which, if you think about it, kinda misses the point of all this stuff.

Upward-Facing Dog Step-by-Step

  1. From Table pose, slowly drop the hips forward toward the floor.
  2. Press palms down into the floor, drop the shoulders down and back, press the chest forward, and reach the crown of the head up towards the ceiling.
  3. Inhale and lift thighs and legs off of the floor by pressing the tops of the feet down and engaging Mula Bandha.
  4. Breathe and hold for 1-3 breaths.
  5. To release: bend the knees and lift the hips back up into Table Pose.

Benefits of Urdhva Mukha Svanasana

  • Best exercise for your wrists.
  • Beneficial for lower back coz this pose stretches the lower back muscles.
  • Stretches the muscles of the shoulders and chest also.
  • It tones and stimulates the abdominal muscles and organs
  • It improves the posture of the body.
  • Beneficial for chest, heart and lungs.
  • It stretches the upper back and front of your body
  • Gives strength to your shoulders, wrists, arms and back bone.

 

Trikonasana (Extended Triangle Pose)

Trikonasana (Extended Triangle Pose)

Trikonasana or the triangle pose is a good stretching exercise which gives flexibility to the spine and pelvic region. In Sanskrit ‘trikona’ means ‘three corners’ or a ‘triangle’.

Trikonasana is an excellent posture to develop strength and balance. It also gives flexibility to the legs, waist and knees. It gives a sense of expansiveness as the arms and torso are bent and reaches for the toes. It gives a sense of balance for the whole body. Those who have stiff legs, knees and waist can use this posture to regain their flexibility and strength.

Alignment & Anatomical Focus:

At either end of the spine lie the triangular shaped bones of the sacrum (at the base) and the occiput (at the base of the back of the skull).The asana has two lines of energy radiating outward from the centre pelvis. The first line of energy moves down the legs and into the feet. The second line travels through the spine and arms into the hands.

In satanic ritual, conjuring demons requires that three black animals are sacrificed. The three primary gods (Anu, Bel, and Ea) of ancient Babylon represent Heaven, Earth and the Abyss.

The symbolic importance of triangles and the number three can be found throughout history and across all cultures. We can find it in the following well-known grouping of concepts such as:
1. Body, mind, and spirit.
2. Past, present, and future.
3. Art, science, and religion.

Benefits Of Uthitha Trikonasana (ExtendedTriangle Pose)

  • Strengthens and stretches the legs
  • Stretches the hips, hamstring and spine
  • Opens the chest to improve breathing, this helps with the treatment of asthma.
  • Relieves mild back pain
  • Stimulates the abdominal organs and aids with digestive problems.
  • Improves sense of balance