Chair Pose – Utkatasana

Chair Pose clearly works the muscles of the arms and legs, but it also stimulates the diaphragm and heart. We know this one can be killer, but it’s definitely worth it. Do you know what “utkata” means in Sanskrit? It means fierce, and “asana” means pose. We get Chair Pose from the fact that you mimic the position of sitting in a chair. Nevertheless, if you’re looking to tone those tired legs, Utkatasana can bring out your fierce side!

To emphasize the health benefits of this posture, you can try a more advanced variation. Once you are in position, brings your hands together at your heart like you are praying. Twist to the right side, keeping the left elbow outside the right knee. Stay low and keep the knees pressed together. Come back to center and repeat on the opposite side.

Beginners Tip

If you are having trouble relaxing into this pose, stop trying to force yourself into a shape your body isn’t ready to make. Try one or more of the above modifications to help find the right chair for you.

How To Do Utkatasana (Chair Pose)

  1. Stand in Tadasana. Inhale and raise your arms perpendicular to the floor. Either keep the arms parallel, palms facing inward, or join the palms.
  2. Exhale and bend your knees, trying to take the thighs as nearly parallel to the floor as possible. The knees will project out over the feet, and the torso will lean slightly forward over the thighs until the front torso forms approximately a right angle with the tops of the thighs. Keep the inner thighs parallel to each other and press the heads of the thigh bones down toward the heels.
  3. Firm your shoulder blades against the back. Take your tailbone down toward the floor and in

toward your pubis to keep the lower back long.

4.  Stay for 30 seconds to a minute. To come out of this pose straighten your knees with an

inhalation, lifting strongly through the arms. Exhale and release your arms to your sides into Tadasana.

Prasarita Padottanasana (Wide-Legged Standing Forward Bend)

When you practice Prasarita Padottanasana (Wide-Legged Standing Forward Bend), the aim is to fold forward from the hips so that you can stretch your hamstrings without straining your back. It doesn’t matter how close you get to the ground. What matters is that you learn to stabilize your legs and your spine while you bend forward.
When you do Prasarita Padottanasana mindfully, it stretches your hamstrings, calves, and hips; strengthens your feet, ankles, and legs; and builds awareness of how to protect your lower back. This pose is also a mild inversion, as it lowers your head and heart below your hips. The combination of the inverted shape and the forward fold tends to bring a wonderful feeling of calmness. Finally, this pose will build strength in your shoulders and upper back, and it will give length and ease to your neck muscles.

If you have tight hamstrings or hips, this pose will require a bit more skill and patience. Tight hamstrings will make it difficult for you to fold very far before your lower back begins to round. If this happens to you, bend your knees slightly to ease the stretch on your hamstrings so that you can keep your low back long and fold forward from your hip joints. Or you can choose to not go all the way to the floor: Place blocks under your hands to lift the floor to you.

How To Do The Prasarita Padottanasana

  1.  To begin this asana, stand at the front of your mat in the Tadasana.
  2. Inhale. Take a step backward with your right foot so that your body faces the long edge of the mat.
  3. Stretch your hands out such that they are at shoulder height and right above your feet. Then, bring your hands to your hips.
  4. Inhale, and lengthen your chest and heart skywards, such that your torso is stretched as well. Exhale and bend forward until your fingertips touch the mat in front of you.

Beginner’s Tips

As beginners, it might be hard for you to touch your crown to the floor. Push yourself only as much as you can. Use a blanket, bolster, or a padded block to support your head in this asana.

Revolved Side Angle Pose

Revolved Side Angle Pose is a deep, standing twist that challenges your balance and strengthens your legs and core. It’s a powerful variation on Extended Side Angle Pose (Utthita Parsvakonasana). It also combines the benefits of Warrior I (Virabhadrasana I) and Crescent Lunge Twist (Parivrtta Anjaneyasana).

The Sanskrit name for this pose, “Parivrtta Parsvakonasana” (PAHR-ee-VREE-tah PARZH-vuh-ko-NAHS-uh-nuh), comes from four words:

“Parivrtta” — meaning “revolved””Parsva” — meaning “side” or “flank””Kona” — meaning “angle””Asana” — meaning “pose”

It also goes by various English names, including “Twisting Side Angle,” “Rotated Side Angle,” “Side Angle Twist,” and others. But no matter what your yoga teacher calls it, you’ll still gain all of the benefits from practicing this challenging, standing twist!

Benefits of Revolved Side Angle Pose

Revolved Side Angle stretches, tones, and strengthens the entire body, inside and out. It stretches the thighs, knees, ankles, calves, groins, chest, and shoulders. This pose builds strength in the legs, as well, particularly in the quadriceps and ankles. It also stimulates and tones the abdominal organs and lungs, which improves digestion, elimination, metabolism, and breathing capacity.

How To Do  Revolved Side Angle Pose

  1. Start by standing on your knees, and take your left leg in front into a 90 angle.
    2. Lean your body towards your left leg, and twist towards the left.
  2. Bring your right elbow past your left knee, and place the hands in prayer position.
  3. Straighten the back leg and leave the heel open.
    5. To enter the full pose, place your right hand on the floor (or on a block) on the outer side of the left leg, and bring the left arm up towards the ceiling. If this feels comfortable, you can bring your right arm further to form one line with the rest of the body.

Cat Pose (Marjariasana)

Sanskrit Name: Marjaryasana
Marjari = Cat
Asana = Cow

The cat pose yoga is fairly a simple pose. But in the event you find it hard to round the top of your upper back, you could ask a friend or your instructor to help you out. Ask them to place their hand between and above the shoulder blades so that it can help activate that region.

It might be a good idea to start off the practice with the preparatory poses so that your muscles are flexed enough by the time you come to this asana.

According to the CDC, back pain strikes 80 percent of the people in our population at some time in their life. This makes it imperative that we teach our spines to be more flexible through poses such as Cat and Cow.  Think about it, your back health means everything when it comes to living your life fully! Keeping a healthy spine is crucial and part of that includes flexibility training.

Step by step

  • Start on your hands and knees (all fours). Knees directly under hips and wrists, elbows and shoulders in line with each other. Neck in line with your spine, gaze resting softly on the floor.
  • Spread your fingers and press through the base of the fingers and the finger tips.
  • Exhale and round your spine towards the ceiling, lifting the side waists.
  • Pull in your abdominals and tuck your tailbone, gently contracting your glutes. Try to keep your shoulders and knees in position.
  • Release your head towards the floor and press firmly into your hands.
  • Inhale and come back into your neutral starting position.

Modifications

If you experience anxiety, it is best to avoid breath retention due to the potential spike in the sympathetic nervous system (fight/flight response center) and focus on the exhale to promote the parasympathetic nervous system (rest/digest response center).

 

Benefits of Marjariasana (The Cat Pose)

  1. Marjariasana loosens up the spine and make it flexible. It gets rid of stiffness in the back muscles.
  2. It is good for those suffering from Spondylitis and slipped disk.
  3. Marjariasana also has an indirect effect on the organs of the lower abdomen, including the digestive system, intestines and the reproductive organs. It gives a good massage and stretch to these organs.

 

STANDING SPINAL TWIST YOGA POSE (KATICHAKRASANA)

The word Katichakrasana comes from the Sanskrit words ‘Kati’ which means waist, ‘Chakra’ which means wheel or circular rotation and ‘Asana’ which means pose. It is also one of the basic yoga asanas that can be easily performed by a beginner. The only thing that is needed is to have a balance of the feet.
Uttanasana is a widely practiced classic standing forward-bend pose that works every part of your body, but particularly your spine. It also wakes up the hamstrings and soothes the mind. Practitioners say this pose rejuvenates the nervous system, eases depression and boosts blood circulation. No wonder it’s so popular!
The standing spinal twist is good exercise for toning legs and arms, increasing flexibility and releasing upper body tension.

How to do standing spinal twist yoga pose

The easy and simple steps to perform Katichakrasana are being described below:

  • Stand straight with one foot comfortably apart.
  • Both the arms should be out-stretched in front of the chest while palms are facing to each other. It should be ensured that distance between the arms remain constant.
  • With exhale, swing the arms to the right side as far as possible by making waist rotation. Maintain the pose as long as you can. With inhale, bring your arms before the chest.
  • The same thing may be followed while bending your arms towards the left side.
  • Perform it 5 to 10 times or up to two minutes.

 Variations

Harder: If you are breathing with ease in the twist, it is fine to move on. You can spread your arms wide apart like wings. Roll open your shoulders.
Easier: To make this pose slightly less strenuous, try performing it in a ‘bound’ position. Bring your top arm behind your back and your bottom arm beneath the thigh of your front leg. Clasp your hands together and hold.

 Benefits of the Standing Spinal Twist (Katichakrasana)

  • Good for relieving constipation
  • Strengthens and improves the flexibility of the spine and waist
  • Good for arm and leg muscles
  • Opens up the neck and shoulders and strengthens the abdominal muscles and lower back
  • Beneficial for those with sedentary or deskbound jobs

 

Urdhva Mukha Svanasana(Upward-Facing Dog Pose )

Upward-Facing Dog Pose — Urdhva Mukha Svanasana (OORD-vuh MOO-kuh shvan-AHS-uh-nuh) — is a back-bending yoga posture that lengthens and strengthens the spine, torso, and arms. Its name comes from four Sanskrit words:

  • “Urdhva” — meaning “upward”
  • “Mukha” — meaning “face”
  • “Svana” — meaning “dog”
  • “Asana” — meaning “pose”

Like most yoga poses, Urdhva Mukha Svanasana must be performed at least 3-5 hours after a meal and it is preferable that your stomach and bowels should be empty at this time. Even though Urdhva Mukha Svanasana is an easy yoga pose, you can perform a few preparatory asanas as this will prepare you both physically and mentally to perform this pose. You can learn a few Urdhva Mukha Svanasana prep poses such as Bhujangasana (Cobra pose), Setu Bandhasana (Bridge pose), and Sarvangasana (Shoulderstand pose) before you learn how to do Upward Facing Dog Pose pose

Beginner’s Tips

Let go of that silly, silly belief that you need to lift your chin. Let that be the icing on the cake. Think this pose more of a chest opener than backbend. Drawing the nose into the face helps to lengthen the neck and melt the shoulders away from the ears, creating more space to open up.

Oh, and BREATHE! Otherwise, you will die…which, if you think about it, kinda misses the point of all this stuff.

Upward-Facing Dog Step-by-Step

  1. From Table pose, slowly drop the hips forward toward the floor.
  2. Press palms down into the floor, drop the shoulders down and back, press the chest forward, and reach the crown of the head up towards the ceiling.
  3. Inhale and lift thighs and legs off of the floor by pressing the tops of the feet down and engaging Mula Bandha.
  4. Breathe and hold for 1-3 breaths.
  5. To release: bend the knees and lift the hips back up into Table Pose.

Benefits of Urdhva Mukha Svanasana

  • Best exercise for your wrists.
  • Beneficial for lower back coz this pose stretches the lower back muscles.
  • Stretches the muscles of the shoulders and chest also.
  • It tones and stimulates the abdominal muscles and organs
  • It improves the posture of the body.
  • Beneficial for chest, heart and lungs.
  • It stretches the upper back and front of your body
  • Gives strength to your shoulders, wrists, arms and back bone.

 

Trikonasana (Extended Triangle Pose)

Trikonasana (Extended Triangle Pose)

Trikonasana or the triangle pose is a good stretching exercise which gives flexibility to the spine and pelvic region. In Sanskrit ‘trikona’ means ‘three corners’ or a ‘triangle’.

Trikonasana is an excellent posture to develop strength and balance. It also gives flexibility to the legs, waist and knees. It gives a sense of expansiveness as the arms and torso are bent and reaches for the toes. It gives a sense of balance for the whole body. Those who have stiff legs, knees and waist can use this posture to regain their flexibility and strength.

Alignment & Anatomical Focus:

At either end of the spine lie the triangular shaped bones of the sacrum (at the base) and the occiput (at the base of the back of the skull).The asana has two lines of energy radiating outward from the centre pelvis. The first line of energy moves down the legs and into the feet. The second line travels through the spine and arms into the hands.

In satanic ritual, conjuring demons requires that three black animals are sacrificed. The three primary gods (Anu, Bel, and Ea) of ancient Babylon represent Heaven, Earth and the Abyss.

The symbolic importance of triangles and the number three can be found throughout history and across all cultures. We can find it in the following well-known grouping of concepts such as:
1. Body, mind, and spirit.
2. Past, present, and future.
3. Art, science, and religion.

Benefits Of Uthitha Trikonasana (ExtendedTriangle Pose)

  • Strengthens and stretches the legs
  • Stretches the hips, hamstring and spine
  • Opens the chest to improve breathing, this helps with the treatment of asthma.
  • Relieves mild back pain
  • Stimulates the abdominal organs and aids with digestive problems.
  • Improves sense of balance