Halasana (Plow Pose)

 

Hal’ stands for ‘plow’ and ‘Asana’ stands for ‘pose‘. Halasana or ‘the plough pose’ takes its name from the farming instrument, plough, used by farmers across India to prepare the soil for sowing of seeds. In the sequence of asanas, Halasana is usually performed after Sarvangasana, which is basically a shoulder stand. According to Meenakshi Swami, the author of The Science of Yoga, “asanas like halasana, suryanamaskara, seershasana and kapalbharti increase the flow of blood to your head, improving intellectual power as well as memory

Cautions

Do not practice this pose if you are currently experiencing diarrhea. Also avoid this pose if you have glaucoma or other eye problems, or a serious back or neck injury. Women who are menstruating should consult with their teacher before practicing inversions, such as Halasana. Women who are pregnant can practice Halasana if it is already a part of their regular practice; otherwise, wait at least eight weeks after giving birth before attempting this pose. Those with asthma or high blood pressure should only practice a version of the pose with the legs supported if the feet do not come all the way to the ground (see Modifications & Variations, below).

GENERAL BENEFITS:

Improves the tone and strength of back muscles as the back is folded, as well as the leg muscles and abdominal muscles. It also removes the rigidity of the back muscles. Improves the working of the spinal nerves, putting pressure on the nerves in the neck region which are predominantly sympathetic. Improves the function of the thyroid, parathyroid and pituitary glands. All of the other endocrine glands are regulated by these main glands and so the overall function of the endocrine system is improved. This results in the improved functioning of all the systems of the body. Gives a complete stretch to the spine which increases its elasticity and overall functioning. Activates digestion and helps with constipation, improves the efficiency of all the abdominal organs such as the spleen, pancreas, liver and kidneys. The breathing movements of the diaphragm help to massage the abdominal organs. Activates the thyroid gland and thymus gland, stimulating metabolism and immunity. Can induce states of pratyahara (sense withdrawal).

How To Do Halasana

  1. Lie on your back. Join the legs together. Relax the whole body (Shavasana position).
  2. Keep the palm flat on the ground. Keep breathing normally.
  3. While exhaling press the palm on ground and raise both the legs upwards straight then try to touch the ground just behind.
  4. Breathe slowly and hold the posture for several minutes (1-2 minutes).
  5. Now slowly release the pose to return to Shavasana.
  6. Repeat this for 3-5 times.

 

Prasarita Padottanasana (Wide-Legged Standing Forward Bend)

When you practice Prasarita Padottanasana (Wide-Legged Standing Forward Bend), the aim is to fold forward from the hips so that you can stretch your hamstrings without straining your back. It doesn’t matter how close you get to the ground. What matters is that you learn to stabilize your legs and your spine while you bend forward.
When you do Prasarita Padottanasana mindfully, it stretches your hamstrings, calves, and hips; strengthens your feet, ankles, and legs; and builds awareness of how to protect your lower back. This pose is also a mild inversion, as it lowers your head and heart below your hips. The combination of the inverted shape and the forward fold tends to bring a wonderful feeling of calmness. Finally, this pose will build strength in your shoulders and upper back, and it will give length and ease to your neck muscles.

If you have tight hamstrings or hips, this pose will require a bit more skill and patience. Tight hamstrings will make it difficult for you to fold very far before your lower back begins to round. If this happens to you, bend your knees slightly to ease the stretch on your hamstrings so that you can keep your low back long and fold forward from your hip joints. Or you can choose to not go all the way to the floor: Place blocks under your hands to lift the floor to you.

How To Do The Prasarita Padottanasana

  1.  To begin this asana, stand at the front of your mat in the Tadasana.
  2. Inhale. Take a step backward with your right foot so that your body faces the long edge of the mat.
  3. Stretch your hands out such that they are at shoulder height and right above your feet. Then, bring your hands to your hips.
  4. Inhale, and lengthen your chest and heart skywards, such that your torso is stretched as well. Exhale and bend forward until your fingertips touch the mat in front of you.

Beginner’s Tips

As beginners, it might be hard for you to touch your crown to the floor. Push yourself only as much as you can. Use a blanket, bolster, or a padded block to support your head in this asana.

Revolved Side Angle Pose

Revolved Side Angle Pose is a deep, standing twist that challenges your balance and strengthens your legs and core. It’s a powerful variation on Extended Side Angle Pose (Utthita Parsvakonasana). It also combines the benefits of Warrior I (Virabhadrasana I) and Crescent Lunge Twist (Parivrtta Anjaneyasana).

The Sanskrit name for this pose, “Parivrtta Parsvakonasana” (PAHR-ee-VREE-tah PARZH-vuh-ko-NAHS-uh-nuh), comes from four words:

“Parivrtta” — meaning “revolved””Parsva” — meaning “side” or “flank””Kona” — meaning “angle””Asana” — meaning “pose”

It also goes by various English names, including “Twisting Side Angle,” “Rotated Side Angle,” “Side Angle Twist,” and others. But no matter what your yoga teacher calls it, you’ll still gain all of the benefits from practicing this challenging, standing twist!

Benefits of Revolved Side Angle Pose

Revolved Side Angle stretches, tones, and strengthens the entire body, inside and out. It stretches the thighs, knees, ankles, calves, groins, chest, and shoulders. This pose builds strength in the legs, as well, particularly in the quadriceps and ankles. It also stimulates and tones the abdominal organs and lungs, which improves digestion, elimination, metabolism, and breathing capacity.

How To Do  Revolved Side Angle Pose

  1. Start by standing on your knees, and take your left leg in front into a 90 angle.
    2. Lean your body towards your left leg, and twist towards the left.
  2. Bring your right elbow past your left knee, and place the hands in prayer position.
  3. Straighten the back leg and leave the heel open.
    5. To enter the full pose, place your right hand on the floor (or on a block) on the outer side of the left leg, and bring the left arm up towards the ceiling. If this feels comfortable, you can bring your right arm further to form one line with the rest of the body.

What Is Vrikshasana

The name ‘Vrikshasana’ is comes from Sanskrit, in which ‘Vriksha’ means Tree and meaning of Asana is to seat, pose or posture. When this pose is performed effectively, it would seem that a tree. As it were, you stop like a tree in the last position of this stance. The leg that you are remaining on resembles a trunk attached to the ground with arms and the other leg and the head go about as branches and clears out. So it is called Tree pose. This Pose has a place with the Inverted Balancing gathering of stances. It is a standout amongst the most troublesome, intriguing and powerful yoga postures.

 

Benefits of Vrikshasana:

Vrikshasana (tree pose yoga) is useful for people suffering from spine deformities, upper and lower extremities joint arthritis, shoulder and leg weakness, and also giddiness. It alleviates pain in rheumatism patients, strengthens the ligaments of feet, tendons and arches, helps in improving neromuscular coordination, and makes your leg stronger. This pose also increases concentration power, balance, and flexibility.

 

Tree Pose Step-By-Step

  1. Start with Tadasana (Mountain Pose)
  2. Bring your palms together at heart center.
  3. Rooting through the four corners of your right foot and engaging your right quadricep and your core, slowly lift your left leg and bring the sole of the foot anywhere above or below your right knee. *Never on your knee!!
  4. Inhale and lengthen through the crown of your head. Find your focus directly in front of you and keep it at a soft gaze.
  5. As you take your five deep breaths here, you can choose any arm variation such as raising your arms over your head, keeping it in prayer or separated but still in alignment with your shoulders–growing your tree.
  6. Slowly release your arms back to heart center and release the left leg. Repeat on the right side.

 

What is a yoga exercise

Many people avoid yoga because they’re not flexible, but Carter says they are the very ones who should take up the practice! Yoga increases concentration, strengthens muscles, dials down stress, and can give you better posture.

Before you get started: Remember to maintain a smooth and even breath throughout the poses and don’t hold any pose longer than you’re physically able. You can increase the length and deepness of each pose with practice. One sign that you held a pose for too long is that you don’t have enough energy to come out of the position with grace and integrity.

Yoga will help you lose weight. Practicing yoga changes your mind: It changes the way you approach life, your body, and eating. Yoga shows you how to appreciate your body for all of the amazing things that it can do for you and points you in the direction of wanting to fill your body with the best possible fuel rather than processed junk food. And changing your mind about your body and the foods you feed it will be a much more effective weight-loss tool than burning a bunch of calories in an aggressive kick-boxing class and then mindlessly plowing through equal or more calories later that day.

5 Awesome Yoga Exercise To Practice In The Morning

Cat Pose (Marjariasana)

Urdhva Mukha Svanasana(Upward-Facing Dog Pose )

 Surya Namaskar (Sun Salutations)

Utkatasana (Chair Pose)

Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward Facing Dog)

What is the meaning of hatha in yoga

Hatha is a Sanskirt word of two parts: ‘Ha’ for sun and ‘tha’ meaning moon. Characteristics related with the sun are passion, masculinity and strength, while moon qualities are freshness, femininity and surrender. Together (sun, moon, male and female) contain physical qualities of hot and cold, firm and fluid. It is in our physical bodies that we strive to cultivate a balance of strength and flexibility, learning to balance our effort and surrender in each pose through breath and mind control. The knowledge Hatha expresses is that both sun and moon energy exists within us all. Hatha is a unification of 2 opposites to illuminate all existence into totality and create balanced harmony from within.

Today, hatha is most often used to describe gentle, basic yoga classes with no flow between poses. Expect a slower-paced stretching-focused class with some basic pranayama breathing exercises and perhaps a seated meditation at the end. Hatha classes are a good place to work on your alignment, learn relaxation techniques, and become comfortable with doing yoga while building strength and flexibility.

A hatha yoga routine consists of a series of physical postures and breathing techniques. Routines can take anywhere from 20 minutes to two hours, depending on the needs and ability of the practitioner. Yoga should always be adapted to one’s state of health; that is, a shorter and easier routine should be used when a person is fatigued. Yoga is ideally practiced at the same time every day, to encourage the discipline of the practice. It can be done at any time of day; some prefer it in the morning as a wake-up routine, while others like to wind down and de-stress with yoga at the end of the day.

Today, the term hatha is used in such a broad way that it is difficult to know what a particular hatha class will be like. In most cases, however, it will be relatively gentle, slow and great for beginners or students who prefer a more relaxed style where they hold poses longer. It can vary a lot, so it is a good idea to call the studio before attending the class.

Popular hatha classes include:

Yoga for Hips, Hamstrings and Back.
Hatha Yoga For Beginners: Better Balanace.
Seated Hatha Yoga.
Hatha Yoga to Release the Lower Back.

 

 

What is yoga asanas?

The word asana is usually translated as “pose” or “posture,” but its more literal meaning is “comfortable seat.” Through their observations of nature, the yogis discovered a vast repertoire of energetic expressions, strong physical effect on the body but also a concomitant psychological effect. Each movement demands that we hone some aspect of our consciousness and use ourselves in a new way. The vast diversity of asanas is no accident, for through exploring both familiar and unfamiliar postures we are also expanding our consciousness, so that regardless of the situation or form we find ourselves in, we can remain “comfortably seated” in our center. Intrinsic to this practice is the uncompromising belief that every aspect of the body is pervaded by consciousness. Asana practice is a way to develop this interior awareness.

The practice of Hatha Yoga (Yoga exercises) can be easily moved into a state of Ego where one drives expectations and goals into the Yoga poses. Rather than connecting with in the Inner Self, the practice of Yoga exercises moves one deeper into the physical reality of disillusion.

Western culture has easily turned Yoga exercises into another form of superficial workout routines and, rather than having a holistic connection, many people are moving to a place of obsession with the body and its’ achievements. Asana can be described as a physical state of the body such that the posture moves one into an existence of wholeness and steadiness allowing one to reflect inwards on the entire being.

Yoga is an incredible practice that is way beyond a regular workout. It works on the mind, body, and soul. It is not just a set of challenging limb-twisting poses. When you combine your breath with movement, yoga becomes something beautiful. It uplifts you both physically and mentally. Eventually, you will realize that yoga is actually effortless and easy.

12 Easy Yoga Poses For Beginners

  1. Tadasana
  2. Uttanasana
  3. Virabhadrasana I
  4. Adho Mukha Svanasana
  5. Vrikshasana
  6. Bhujangasana
  7. Marjariasana
  8. Balasana