Matsyasana (Fish Pose)

 

The Matsyasana causes a stretching on the thyroid and parathyroid glands, thereby improving their function and counter balancing the effects of the Jalandhar bandha. It stretches the intestines, liver, pancreas, bladder and other abdominal organs which improves their functioning and efficiency. Reduces blood supply to the legs and redirects it to the reproductive and pelvic organs. Stagnant blood around vertebral column is drained. Improves supply to brain and face, also stretches the carotid artery. The reproductive system is improved due to the increased blood supply. Toning of abdominal, thigh and intercostal muscles. Toning of intercostals muscles help in deep breathing, so it is helpful in asthma and bronchitis. It opens up the chest and lungs. Haemorrhoids. Increases circulation to the back which helps in backache and cervical spondylitis. Boosts the immune system due to its effect on the thymus gland. Loosens the spine and prevents round shoulders. Loosens the legs and prepares them for meditation poses

Benefits Of Matsyasana (Fish Pose)

Stretches and stimulates the muscles of your abdomen, neck, and throat
Strengthens the muscles of your upper back and the back of your neck
Helps relieve tension in the neck and shoulders
Helps to improve your posture and provides relief from respiratory disorders

How To Do Matsyasana

  Begin by lying on your back with your legs extended and your arms resting alongside your body, palms down.

  Press your forearms and elbows into the floor and lift your chest to create an arch in your upper back. Lift your shoulderblades and upper torso off the floor. Tilt your head back and bring the crown of your head to the floor.

  Keep pressing through your hands and forearms. There should be very little weight pressing through your head.

  Keep your thighs active and energized. Press outward through your heels.

 

Trianga Mukhaikapada Paschimottanasana

The complicated name of Trianga Mukhaikapada Paschimottanasana means Forward Bend With Three Limbs Facing Forward. In this seated posture one foot is bent and placed on the outside of the buttock, while the other leg is kept straight. To not fall over the practitioner needs to actively push the buttocks on the side of the bent leg down towards the floor utilizing the abdominal muscles. Initially one may use a hand to avoid falling over to one side, but as with all props, also the natural ones, it is important to be vigilant not to rely on them longer than absolutely needed as this might hinder the development into the full posture. Persons with knee injuries might find this painful, as well as those with tight quadriceps. One way to approach the full posture is to start by keeping both legs bent with the feet at the outsides of the hips.When performed correctly Trianga Mukhaikapada Paschimottanasa works to build abdominal stregnth and to increase the range of movement in the joints of the hip and knee.

BENEFITS

  1. Tones and stimulates the abdominal organs.
  2. Assists digestion.
  3. Reduces flatulence and constipation.
  4. Creates flexibility in the knee joint.
  5. Creates flexibility in hips and hamstrings.

 

STEP BY STEP GUIDE – THREE PARTS FORWARD BEND POSE

  1. Start with forming the Dandasana (Staff Pose) on yoga mat.
  2. Bring your left foot back as for Hero Pose (Virasana).
  3. Exhale; try to take hold of the outer edge of your right foot by bending forward.
  4. Inhale; now pull the arms back.
  5. Slowly lift and open your chest.
  6. Exhale; drawn the chin towards your shin.
  7. Bend your elbows and extend the trunk forward.
  8. Hold in this position for few seconds (10 to 60 seconds).

Chair Pose – Utkatasana

Chair Pose clearly works the muscles of the arms and legs, but it also stimulates the diaphragm and heart. We know this one can be killer, but it’s definitely worth it. Do you know what “utkata” means in Sanskrit? It means fierce, and “asana” means pose. We get Chair Pose from the fact that you mimic the position of sitting in a chair. Nevertheless, if you’re looking to tone those tired legs, Utkatasana can bring out your fierce side!

To emphasize the health benefits of this posture, you can try a more advanced variation. Once you are in position, brings your hands together at your heart like you are praying. Twist to the right side, keeping the left elbow outside the right knee. Stay low and keep the knees pressed together. Come back to center and repeat on the opposite side.

Beginners Tip

If you are having trouble relaxing into this pose, stop trying to force yourself into a shape your body isn’t ready to make. Try one or more of the above modifications to help find the right chair for you.

How To Do Utkatasana (Chair Pose)

  1. Stand in Tadasana. Inhale and raise your arms perpendicular to the floor. Either keep the arms parallel, palms facing inward, or join the palms.
  2. Exhale and bend your knees, trying to take the thighs as nearly parallel to the floor as possible. The knees will project out over the feet, and the torso will lean slightly forward over the thighs until the front torso forms approximately a right angle with the tops of the thighs. Keep the inner thighs parallel to each other and press the heads of the thigh bones down toward the heels.
  3. Firm your shoulder blades against the back. Take your tailbone down toward the floor and in

toward your pubis to keep the lower back long.

4.  Stay for 30 seconds to a minute. To come out of this pose straighten your knees with an

inhalation, lifting strongly through the arms. Exhale and release your arms to your sides into Tadasana.

Prasarita Padottanasana (Wide-Legged Standing Forward Bend)

When you practice Prasarita Padottanasana (Wide-Legged Standing Forward Bend), the aim is to fold forward from the hips so that you can stretch your hamstrings without straining your back. It doesn’t matter how close you get to the ground. What matters is that you learn to stabilize your legs and your spine while you bend forward.
When you do Prasarita Padottanasana mindfully, it stretches your hamstrings, calves, and hips; strengthens your feet, ankles, and legs; and builds awareness of how to protect your lower back. This pose is also a mild inversion, as it lowers your head and heart below your hips. The combination of the inverted shape and the forward fold tends to bring a wonderful feeling of calmness. Finally, this pose will build strength in your shoulders and upper back, and it will give length and ease to your neck muscles.

If you have tight hamstrings or hips, this pose will require a bit more skill and patience. Tight hamstrings will make it difficult for you to fold very far before your lower back begins to round. If this happens to you, bend your knees slightly to ease the stretch on your hamstrings so that you can keep your low back long and fold forward from your hip joints. Or you can choose to not go all the way to the floor: Place blocks under your hands to lift the floor to you.

How To Do The Prasarita Padottanasana

  1.  To begin this asana, stand at the front of your mat in the Tadasana.
  2. Inhale. Take a step backward with your right foot so that your body faces the long edge of the mat.
  3. Stretch your hands out such that they are at shoulder height and right above your feet. Then, bring your hands to your hips.
  4. Inhale, and lengthen your chest and heart skywards, such that your torso is stretched as well. Exhale and bend forward until your fingertips touch the mat in front of you.

Beginner’s Tips

As beginners, it might be hard for you to touch your crown to the floor. Push yourself only as much as you can. Use a blanket, bolster, or a padded block to support your head in this asana.

Revolved Side Angle Pose

Revolved Side Angle Pose is a deep, standing twist that challenges your balance and strengthens your legs and core. It’s a powerful variation on Extended Side Angle Pose (Utthita Parsvakonasana). It also combines the benefits of Warrior I (Virabhadrasana I) and Crescent Lunge Twist (Parivrtta Anjaneyasana).

The Sanskrit name for this pose, “Parivrtta Parsvakonasana” (PAHR-ee-VREE-tah PARZH-vuh-ko-NAHS-uh-nuh), comes from four words:

“Parivrtta” — meaning “revolved””Parsva” — meaning “side” or “flank””Kona” — meaning “angle””Asana” — meaning “pose”

It also goes by various English names, including “Twisting Side Angle,” “Rotated Side Angle,” “Side Angle Twist,” and others. But no matter what your yoga teacher calls it, you’ll still gain all of the benefits from practicing this challenging, standing twist!

Benefits of Revolved Side Angle Pose

Revolved Side Angle stretches, tones, and strengthens the entire body, inside and out. It stretches the thighs, knees, ankles, calves, groins, chest, and shoulders. This pose builds strength in the legs, as well, particularly in the quadriceps and ankles. It also stimulates and tones the abdominal organs and lungs, which improves digestion, elimination, metabolism, and breathing capacity.

How To Do  Revolved Side Angle Pose

  1. Start by standing on your knees, and take your left leg in front into a 90 angle.
    2. Lean your body towards your left leg, and twist towards the left.
  2. Bring your right elbow past your left knee, and place the hands in prayer position.
  3. Straighten the back leg and leave the heel open.
    5. To enter the full pose, place your right hand on the floor (or on a block) on the outer side of the left leg, and bring the left arm up towards the ceiling. If this feels comfortable, you can bring your right arm further to form one line with the rest of the body.

What Is Vrikshasana

The name ‘Vrikshasana’ is comes from Sanskrit, in which ‘Vriksha’ means Tree and meaning of Asana is to seat, pose or posture. When this pose is performed effectively, it would seem that a tree. As it were, you stop like a tree in the last position of this stance. The leg that you are remaining on resembles a trunk attached to the ground with arms and the other leg and the head go about as branches and clears out. So it is called Tree pose. This Pose has a place with the Inverted Balancing gathering of stances. It is a standout amongst the most troublesome, intriguing and powerful yoga postures.

 

Benefits of Vrikshasana:

Vrikshasana (tree pose yoga) is useful for people suffering from spine deformities, upper and lower extremities joint arthritis, shoulder and leg weakness, and also giddiness. It alleviates pain in rheumatism patients, strengthens the ligaments of feet, tendons and arches, helps in improving neromuscular coordination, and makes your leg stronger. This pose also increases concentration power, balance, and flexibility.

 

Tree Pose Step-By-Step

  1. Start with Tadasana (Mountain Pose)
  2. Bring your palms together at heart center.
  3. Rooting through the four corners of your right foot and engaging your right quadricep and your core, slowly lift your left leg and bring the sole of the foot anywhere above or below your right knee. *Never on your knee!!
  4. Inhale and lengthen through the crown of your head. Find your focus directly in front of you and keep it at a soft gaze.
  5. As you take your five deep breaths here, you can choose any arm variation such as raising your arms over your head, keeping it in prayer or separated but still in alignment with your shoulders–growing your tree.
  6. Slowly release your arms back to heart center and release the left leg. Repeat on the right side.

 

What is a yoga exercise

Many people avoid yoga because they’re not flexible, but Carter says they are the very ones who should take up the practice! Yoga increases concentration, strengthens muscles, dials down stress, and can give you better posture.

Before you get started: Remember to maintain a smooth and even breath throughout the poses and don’t hold any pose longer than you’re physically able. You can increase the length and deepness of each pose with practice. One sign that you held a pose for too long is that you don’t have enough energy to come out of the position with grace and integrity.

Yoga will help you lose weight. Practicing yoga changes your mind: It changes the way you approach life, your body, and eating. Yoga shows you how to appreciate your body for all of the amazing things that it can do for you and points you in the direction of wanting to fill your body with the best possible fuel rather than processed junk food. And changing your mind about your body and the foods you feed it will be a much more effective weight-loss tool than burning a bunch of calories in an aggressive kick-boxing class and then mindlessly plowing through equal or more calories later that day.

5 Awesome Yoga Exercise To Practice In The Morning

Cat Pose (Marjariasana)

Urdhva Mukha Svanasana(Upward-Facing Dog Pose )

 Surya Namaskar (Sun Salutations)

Utkatasana (Chair Pose)

Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward Facing Dog)

Cat Pose (Marjariasana)

Sanskrit Name: Marjaryasana
Marjari = Cat
Asana = Cow

The cat pose yoga is fairly a simple pose. But in the event you find it hard to round the top of your upper back, you could ask a friend or your instructor to help you out. Ask them to place their hand between and above the shoulder blades so that it can help activate that region.

It might be a good idea to start off the practice with the preparatory poses so that your muscles are flexed enough by the time you come to this asana.

According to the CDC, back pain strikes 80 percent of the people in our population at some time in their life. This makes it imperative that we teach our spines to be more flexible through poses such as Cat and Cow.  Think about it, your back health means everything when it comes to living your life fully! Keeping a healthy spine is crucial and part of that includes flexibility training.

Step by step

  • Start on your hands and knees (all fours). Knees directly under hips and wrists, elbows and shoulders in line with each other. Neck in line with your spine, gaze resting softly on the floor.
  • Spread your fingers and press through the base of the fingers and the finger tips.
  • Exhale and round your spine towards the ceiling, lifting the side waists.
  • Pull in your abdominals and tuck your tailbone, gently contracting your glutes. Try to keep your shoulders and knees in position.
  • Release your head towards the floor and press firmly into your hands.
  • Inhale and come back into your neutral starting position.

Modifications

If you experience anxiety, it is best to avoid breath retention due to the potential spike in the sympathetic nervous system (fight/flight response center) and focus on the exhale to promote the parasympathetic nervous system (rest/digest response center).

 

Benefits of Marjariasana (The Cat Pose)

  1. Marjariasana loosens up the spine and make it flexible. It gets rid of stiffness in the back muscles.
  2. It is good for those suffering from Spondylitis and slipped disk.
  3. Marjariasana also has an indirect effect on the organs of the lower abdomen, including the digestive system, intestines and the reproductive organs. It gives a good massage and stretch to these organs.

 

STANDING SPINAL TWIST YOGA POSE (KATICHAKRASANA)

The word Katichakrasana comes from the Sanskrit words ‘Kati’ which means waist, ‘Chakra’ which means wheel or circular rotation and ‘Asana’ which means pose. It is also one of the basic yoga asanas that can be easily performed by a beginner. The only thing that is needed is to have a balance of the feet.
Uttanasana is a widely practiced classic standing forward-bend pose that works every part of your body, but particularly your spine. It also wakes up the hamstrings and soothes the mind. Practitioners say this pose rejuvenates the nervous system, eases depression and boosts blood circulation. No wonder it’s so popular!
The standing spinal twist is good exercise for toning legs and arms, increasing flexibility and releasing upper body tension.

How to do standing spinal twist yoga pose

The easy and simple steps to perform Katichakrasana are being described below:

  • Stand straight with one foot comfortably apart.
  • Both the arms should be out-stretched in front of the chest while palms are facing to each other. It should be ensured that distance between the arms remain constant.
  • With exhale, swing the arms to the right side as far as possible by making waist rotation. Maintain the pose as long as you can. With inhale, bring your arms before the chest.
  • The same thing may be followed while bending your arms towards the left side.
  • Perform it 5 to 10 times or up to two minutes.

 Variations

Harder: If you are breathing with ease in the twist, it is fine to move on. You can spread your arms wide apart like wings. Roll open your shoulders.
Easier: To make this pose slightly less strenuous, try performing it in a ‘bound’ position. Bring your top arm behind your back and your bottom arm beneath the thigh of your front leg. Clasp your hands together and hold.

 Benefits of the Standing Spinal Twist (Katichakrasana)

  • Good for relieving constipation
  • Strengthens and improves the flexibility of the spine and waist
  • Good for arm and leg muscles
  • Opens up the neck and shoulders and strengthens the abdominal muscles and lower back
  • Beneficial for those with sedentary or deskbound jobs

 

Corpse Pose (Savasana)

The final pose of any yoga class is one of deep restoration: Corpse Pose, also sometimes called Final Relaxation Pose. Its Sanskrit name, “Savasana” (shah-VAHS-uh-nuh), comes from two words. The first is “Sava” (meaning “corpse”), and the second is “asana” (meaning “pose”). Savasana implies a depth of release that goes beyond simple relaxation. This resting pose takes your yoga practice to a place where you can completely let go.

It looks like the easiest pose in the whole yoga practice, but when doing its one the hardest pose. But the benefits of  Savasana are more than any other asana (posture). That’s why it is recommended that you should do savasana after every 30 minutes of yoga practice, if not, than once after finishing the yoga class or practice.

At the end of every yoga class, you know those few minutes when you’re asked to lie down straight, with your legs placed apart and arms by your side. It is a moment when you oscillate between relaxation and blissful sleep by performing an ancient yoga asana known as Shavasana or Savasana (pronounced as Shuh-vaas-ana) that takes its name from two Sanskrit words ‘shava‘ which means cobra and ‘asana‘ which means post.

Benefits Of Shavasana

Savasana relaxes the central nervous system, giving the cells of the body an opportunity to really permeate the fresh oxygenated blood, easing all the muscles and giving them the best treat after its hard work during playtime. Allowing your body to fully immerse in this pose will signal a sense of gratitude for being on the edge, and staying strong through those tough poses. Corpse pose also calms the brain which alleviates headaches, fatigue, stress and mild depression.

 

How To Do Corpse Pose (Savasana)

Set yourself up for success. Stretch out on your mat and be sure you’re completely comfortable. Use bolsters, pillows, blankets, and cover your eyes with an eye pillow or towel. The more comfortable you are, the more you can relax.

Take one final cleansing breath. Your teacher will likely prompt you to take one audible exhale, signaling to your body to release into the pose.

Scan for tension. Mentally run through all the parts of your body and try to make them heavier. Be on the lookout for tension hiding in the jaw, temples, shoulders, and hips

Set an intention.Before you come out of Savasana, take a mental snapshot of how you feel on every level. Ask yourself what you’d like to take with you from your practice, and what you might like to leave behind